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Earthquake Survivors—Bronze and Beyond

IT’S ALL ABOUT LOCATION, LOCATION
Monthly Grounding of Writerly Antennae for IWSGers and Other SpaceTimers

Arcata Plaza, site of Saturday Farmers’ Market, presided over by McKinley bronze—before last week’s removal


Having been assassinated in 1901, one would have thought that statesman, lawyer and (Republican) 25th President of the U.S.A., William McKinley had paid enough for his sins…

But his century-old bronze effigy—which survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire—will be changing locations once again.

The story goes of philanthropist Georg Zehndner, immigrant merchant in frontier Weaverville, seizing an opportunity presented by the late 19thC Gold Rush boom in northern California, to become (wealthy) Humboldt County rancher and (Arcata) citizen. When the 25th President was shot in 1901, Zehndner commissioned Armenian-American Bay Area sculptor Haig Patigian—also an immigrant—to create the bronze casting of the downed statesman.

Market Street, looking west to Twin Peaks. Both sides of street lined with ruined buildings Battery-to-Powell

Arcata Plaza was chosen as a suitable site in the growing town—although currently lauded northernmost campus of Humboldt State University was not founded until eight years later. Yet it is HSU academic/radical protests of ‘settler colonialism’ and damaged Native American tribes which resulted in the statue’s removal at dawn last Thursday.
Arcata is Yurok/Wiyot = place of the Lagoon*
*Yurok oket’oh = “where there is a lagoon” (Humboldt Bay), from o- “place” + ket’oh = “to be a lagoon”. Same name given to Big Lagoon, ten miles North.

Neighboring unincorporated township of McKinleyville, CA has more claim to the beleaguered effigy than the University town, having willingly changed its name to mark its namesake’s death in 1901. Previously called Minor (aka Minorville), it was settled in the late-19thC logging boom. After the president’s assassination it joined with (unincorporated) townships of Dows’ Prairie (settled by Joe Dows, 1860) to North and Calville, settled by employees of the California Barrel Company, South, taking its new name in his honor. McKinleyville post office opened in 1903. The town remains unincorporated, and is home to California’s certified “foggiest” airport—Eureka/Arcata, ACV.

Abandoned and Pointing to the North
Downtown San Francisco was on fire, consuming trolleys and neighborhoods, with horse-drawn water carts unable to dowse the flames.

No melt-down—McKinley found undamaged after 1906 San Francisco fire, his finger pointing North


Coming full blast after the deadly earthquake, many residents ran—sculptor Haig Patigian among them. He saw the bronze casting works go up in smoke and thinking all was lost, fled.

“‘Come on, boys, let’s save the statue of Bill McKinley,’ he cried and under his inspiration the workmen bore a ready hand.” San Francisco Examiner 1906

A passing worker—employed by the Ironworks—saw that the statue would be ruined if abandoned, and called to his co-workers who were saving their own belongings. The Examiner wrote: “They dragged the heroic figure to the center of the street and there it remained unharmed, resting on its back”, with an outstretched hand pointing to the sky.

Returning to the scene, Patigian noticed a crowd gathering near the Works. He hurried over to find his art piece lying in the street—the rescue vehicle used to haul it to safety a charred wreck. Twelve days after the great quake, George Zehndner, Arcata businessman and benefactor who ordered the bronze, received a telegram from Patigian stating the effigy had been saved.

San Francisco City Hall’s surviving dome, 1906, McAllister Street and Van Ness Avenue in charred ruins

Haig Patigian was a respected artist in his day, at the time of his death called by the San Francisco Chronicle “one of the giants of San Francisco’s Golden Age.” Many of his works survive in San Francisco, including one of Abraham Lincoln outside City Hall, itself regenerated and reconstructed after the demise of its iconic predecessor, Chronicle Archive picture, right.

Zehndner paid $15,000 for the original sculpture in 1906—lost, mourned and then recovered unblemished from the glowing coals of the surrounding foundry.

One hundred thirteen years later the now-politically-incorrect statesman found a new home—in Canton, Ohio—where the local residents appreciate his other works—including a McKinley Memorial Library and Museum. The statesman’s 8-1/2foot 800-lb bronze likeness will find a public stance nearby.

Fickle Finger of Fate and Finance

Last week brought some kind of closure to the beleaguered bronze. Through fire, earthquake, flood and (occasional student) harassment, the skilled lost-wax bronze rendering of the late 19thC politician will not bite the dust.

East along Market Street after 1906 Mag.7.9 earthquake—lavish art-deco Call building burns to ground

This time it will rise again on another plinth in another guise: Canton was McKinley’s chosen home town. He had planned to retire there. Now he will.

In Canton, the townspeople have $15,000 to spend. That’s exactly how much its benefactor Arcata resident Zehndner paid for the sculpture in 1906. And Arcata has accepted.

Insecure Challenge and Update
We IWSGers know how Fate—and our writing Muse—tend to travel hand-in-hand. But there’s no telling how fickle financial finagling will affect any outcome.

IWSG question for March

Synchronously, we may therefore empathize with our fellow Insecure Writers in our March IWSG challenge/question

[choose one] Whose perspective do you like to write from best: the hero [protagonist] or the villain [antagonist]?
And why?

Now there’s something to get our [insecure] teeth into.
In McKinley’s case, he is both bad guy and good guy—depending on our —writerly/historical— perceptions.
Which would you choose?
Thanks, blog-Cap’n.Alex for allowing me such digressions 😉
©2019 Marian Youngblood

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March 5, 2019 Posted by | art, authors, belief, blogging, consciousness, culture, elemental, environment, fantasy, fiction, history, Muse, nature, novel, popular, publishing, seismic, writing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Drop, Cover & Wh-a-a-a-t? Falling in Unison off the Cliff

DROP, COVER & WHAT’S THAT YOU’RE SAYING? A-A-A-A-R-R-G-H
…as We Fall in Unison off the Cliff

Give me your hand—there ya go—oops

The Great ShakeOut across the American continent has become a national obsession: an emergency drill—in case of earthquake, fire, flood or tsunami—which drives people on October 18th at 10:18a.m. to

Drop—Cover—and Hold On

when the adrenalin in your cells prompts you to run—for higher ground.

Sixty-three thousand people along the North Coast west of the Cascades, are participating in 2018—from Seattle, WA through Oregon to Northern California, a fraction of the 10million participants in the state of California as a whole. For comparison, Japan ShakeOut drills involve 4.5million people throughout the year.

Preparedness Tip for the Real Thing

10/18 at 10:18—drop, cover & hold on, when you want to run to higher ground

“Put together a grab-n-go emergency kit for work or home—a satchel or small backpack—to include those essentials you need to survive for a few days, if you have only minutes to leave. On my list are water, medications, extra glasses, a thumb drive with photos of important documents, power bars, raincoat, space blanket, flashlight, hand-cranked portable radio and, most important, chocolate. Everyone in your family should have one—children can include a stuffed toy, game or favorite book”
Prof. Emeritus Lori Dengler, HSU Geology dept. ShakeOut guru, October 2018

She suggests we think about what happens if we’re driving when the earthquake hits. A big one will feel like a blowout. So, to avoid having an accident, slow down and stop until the shaking has weakened. It’s good to rehearse a scenario beforehand without fear, so that it prepares us for an actual event. e.g. what would you do if you happened to be in a low area by the coast or bay where a tsunami might follow?

“Pay attention to your surroundings”, says Prof. Dengler. Is the road damaged? Has traffic made the street impassable? How far are you from roads heading inland?

If the street is still passable, proceed slowly to one of those roads. If you can’t drive, leave your car and go on foot.

Counting Calms the Mind
Preparatory thinking need not alarm us. It gets us in the zone. We are restless souls, our minds constantly on the move: motivated either by fear or duty/habit.

Count von Count’s answer was always to count

If you need something to do to keep your mind occupied during the ShakeOut drill—COUNT. Counting will help calm down the adrenalin rush that all of us feel in an earthquake.

And remember to breathe. 😉

After all, what if we are with children, or older ones with disability access issues? we have to try to make counting fun; but keep it practical. Know your local vulnerable areas: stay clear of highways where emergency vehicles have priority.

According to Kevin Cupples, city planner for the town of Seaside, OR, for the seventy-one thousand people living in Cascadia’s Inundation Zone, that will mean evacuating in the narrow window after one disaster ends and before another begins.

“They will be notified to do so only by the earthquake itself—a vibrate-alert system,” he jokes. And he urges people to leave on foot, since the earthquake will render roads impassable. Depending on location, they will have between ten and thirty minutes to get out. That time line does not allow for finding a flashlight, tending to an earthquake injury, hesitating amid the ruins of a home, searching for loved ones, or being a Good Samaritan.

“You protect yourself. When that tsunami is coming, you run for your life.”
Jay Wilson, Chair, Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission (OSSPAC)

This is where counting is useful—the count itself, like thunderclaps seconds after a lightning strike, helps us assess the magnitude of a quake aftershock and/or tsunami floodwaters to come.

Downtown San Francisco’s 1906 earthquake broke water mains, created unquenchable fires

Making the Great ShakeOut fun for children and elders is worth the effort during a practice run, especially as our gut reaction in an actual event will give us no time for amusement! It also helps the family know what their duties are when/if the Big One comes.

Shaking from a Cascadia quake will set off landslides throughout the region—up to 30,000 in Seattle alone, according to city emergency management.

“It will induce a process called liquefaction, whereby seemingly solid ground starts behaving like a liquid, to the detriment of anything on top of it.”

Fifteen per cent of Seattle is built on liquefiable land, including day-care centers and homes of some 34,500 people. Portland is Oregon’s critical energy-infrastructure hub, a six-mile stretch of the city through which 90% of the state’s liquid fuel pipelines flow and where the majority of its electrical substations and natural gas terminals are located.

Together with earth movement, the subsequent sloshing, sliding, and shaking will trigger fires, flooding, pipe failures, dam breaches, and hazardous-material spills. “Any one of these second-order disasters could swamp the original earthquake in terms of cost, damage, or casualties—and one of them definitely will”, according to Wilson.

Four to six minutes after the dogs start barking, the shaking will subside.

For another few minutes, with or without a functional tsunami warning alarm—sounding more dramatic and perilously like a wobble-up&down squeal than a police siren—the whole NorthCoast region—in disarray—will continue to fall apart on its own.

Then the wave will arrive, and the real destruction will begin.
Seriously.
Count for Great ShakeOut 2018: fifty-nine million worldwide, 20.1 million in U.S.A.
Are you in?
©2018 Marian Youngblood

October 18, 2018 Posted by | belief, calendar customs, culture, earth changes, environment, New Earth, ocean | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment